Canadian Council of Churches Expresses Concern about Canada’s Interest in BMD

Tasneem Jamal

Letter to Prime Minister Jean Chrétien and his cabinet.

(français)

May 30, 2003

Dear Prime Minister and Members of the Cabinet:

I am writing to express concern regarding the Canadian Government’s intention to explore possible cooperation with the United States’ plan to deploy a North American ballistic missile defence (BMD) system.

Canadian churches have long engaged the Canadian government on weapons deployment systems since these decisions are profoundly moral in nature, and are evidence of the long-term values we hold. As churches, we offer the following values to consider in your decision-making:

War Prevention and Peacebuilding – Cultivate the development of peaceful means of resolving disputes and continue to promote human security, as the well-being of peoples, for all. We are mandated by God to make peace and shun war.

Disarmament – Insist on strict limits on the use of force. We reiterate here, as we often have in the past, that nuclear weapons are an abomination and contrary to the will of God.

Stewardship – Honour creation – including space – as an abundant source of life and bounty and the common heritage of all humanity forever, free from weapons.

Accountable Public Institutions – The Canadian government, with its responsibility for protection of these values, must retain its own capacity to independently assess, verify and act on perceived threats.

In the light of these values, we write to seek your assurances that the Canadian government will set out the conditions and security requirements that will have to be met before Canada can give material or political support to ballistic missile defence. In particular, we would appreciate your response to the following questions:

  1. Will Canada seek an unqualified commitment from the US that ballistic missile defences will not involve basing or testing any weapons in space and will not break the global norm, or violate long-standing Canadian policy against the placement of weapons in space?
  2. Will Canada be prepared to introduce into the BMD discussions a clear request that the United States government agree to talks in Geneva at the Conference on Disarmament leading to a space weapons ban, before proceeding further with BMD deployment?
  3. Will Canada take advantage of these discussions to seek clarification and disavowal of those elements of the US national security strategy and nuclear doctrine that assert a right to retain the option to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons against non-nuclear
    weapon states?
  4. Will Canada call on the United States to elaborate the ways in which it intends to work with the international community to prevent the proliferation of ballistic missiles?
  5. Finally, will Canada be open to discussing alternative defence cooperation arrangements where NORAD resumes its primary bilateral function, namely cooperation and coordination of air defence?

The attached brief by Project Ploughshares, an ecumenical agency of the Council of Churches specializing in peacebuilding and disarmament, elaborates on the context of each these questions, and we would be pleased if you would take the issues raised into consideration in your response.

We know that the safety and well-being of the people of Canada and indeed, the world can not be found within a technological fortress. The Canadian Council of Churches believe, as Canada’s own policy declares, that the only real protection from nuclear weapons is their
abolition and permanent prohibition, and we fear, with many others, that the pursuit of BMD will undermine – as it already has – existing arms control agreements, and will set back disarmament efforts as other states retain or expand their arsenals in an effort to overcome the perceived advantages of BMD.

We look forward to continuing this dialogue with you, and await your response.

Be assured of our prayers for you in these momentous times, may God’s own wisdom light your path.

Prof. Richard Schneider
President
Canadian Council of Churches

Live under the protection of God Most High and stay in the shadow of God All-Powerful. Then you will say to the Lord, “You are my fortress, my place of safety; you are my God, and I trust you.” (Psalm 91:1-2)

“… they shall beat their swords into ploughshares, and spears into pruning hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation; neither shall they learn war any more” (Isaiah 2:4)

Canada and US Deployment of a Ballistic Missile Defence System: Questions for the Federal Cabinet

May 28, 2003

Foreign Minister Bill Graham has recently stated that “the best way to ensure that Canadian interests are being served is to remain engaged in dialogue with the United States on all issues of our shared continental security” (House of Commons, May 15). The real value of such a dialogue must be measured by the extent to which Canadian security concerns are heard and respected by our dialogue partner.

Canada’s dialogue with Washington should clearly set out the conditions and security requirements that will have to be met before Canada can give any material or political support to ballistic missile defence. The appeal of BMD is obvious. What responsible government would not want to shield its people from attack by nuclear-armed missiles if such protection was available? The responsibility to protect is a paramount function of government, but it unfortunately does not follow that every plan undertaken in the name of protection will actually make people safer and more secure.

The following questions and issues, therefore, should be central to Canada-US discussions on BMD.

1. Will Canada seek an unqualified commitment from the US that ballistic missile defences will not involve basing or testing any weapons in space and will not break the global norm, or violate Canadian policy, against the placement of weapons in space?

The weaponization of space is not simply a vague future possibility; it is a currently declared and explicit US intention to place weapons in space. In April 2003 the Missile Defence Agency (MDA) reported that its pursuit of boost-phase interceptors would initially focus on land- and sea-based interceptors, but that “eventually” interceptors would be deployed on “satellites in low earth orbit.” The report said the MDA would begin developing a space-based kinetic energy interceptor in FY04. Furthermore, its 2004/5 budget projects the deployment of a weapons test bed in space by 2008 “with initial, on-orbit testing to commence with three to five satellites” in 2008/9.

2. Will Canada be prepared to introduce into the BMD discussions a clear request that the United States government agree to talks in Geneva at the Conference on Disarmament leading to a space weapons ban, before proceeding further with BMD deployment?

The Conference on Disarmament (CD) is the primary UN disarmament negotiating body, but talks on a space weapons ban have been stalled in recent years due to an ongoing agenda dispute that the United States could end by simply agreeing to good faith negotiations on “preventing an arms race in outer space.” While the CD is not the only, nor the most effective, venue for such negotiations, any agreement by Canada to support BMD without a corresponding American commitment to negotiating a space weapons ban would represent an abandonment of Canada’s historic commitment to space as a weapons-free zone.

3. Will Canada take advantage of the Canada-US BMD discussions to seek clarification and disavowal of those elements of the US national security strategy and nuclear doctrine that assert a right to retain the option to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons against
non-nuclear weapon states?

The United States continues to explore new generations of nuclear weapons, notably low-yield battlefield weapons designed for use against targets in non-nuclear states (e.g., the so-called bunker buster bombs). The result is to make their own acquisition of a nuclear deterrent all the more attractive to countries in a state of enduring conflict with the United States. Canada could remind the United States that a simple way to dispel much of this proliferation pressure would be for it to disavow the pursuit of new weapons by ratifying the test ban treaty and by an unambiguous reiteration of the “negative security assurances” mandated by the Security Council in 1995 by which nuclear weapon states declare they will not use nor threaten to use nuclear weapons against non-nuclear weapon states.

4. Will Canada call on the United States to elaborate the ways in which it intends to work with the international community to prevent the proliferation of ballistic missiles, especially since the BMD system planned by the US only has a chance of being successful if the missile threat is kept to a minimum?

One of the ironies of the ballistic missile defence is that it only has a real chance of being effective if disarmament diplomacy successfully keeps the threat to minimum. Even the United States acknowledges that BMD’s capacity will be limited to intercepting a very small number of attacking missiles – and even then, no system can guarantee 100 percent success. It follows, therefore, that arms control and disarmament are key to controlling the ballistic missile threat, and thus are key to the success of BMD itself. If the ballistic missile threat is not severely limited, any BMD system will be easily overwhelmed. The United States and Canada therefore have a shared interest in effective non-proliferation diplomacy – and if it is successful enough to make BMD feasible, Canada might suggest to the US that rather than spend hundreds of billions of dollars on a minimal threat, those resources might be better spent on additional disarmament and non-proliferation efforts.

5. Finally, will Canada be open to discussing alternative defence cooperation arrangements where NORAD resumes its primary bilateral function, namely cooperation and coordination of air defence?

The primary cooperative bilateral defence activity that NORAD facilitates is air defence. NORAD also tracks missile launches, but that is part of a national US role linked to its nuclear deterrent. Air defence, however, is a bilateral operation. In the post-Cold War era that
cooperative operation is only minimally concerned with traditional territorial defence matters – instead the focus is on things like drug interdiction and other illegal entries into North America, which is much more central to current security concerns and hence to the work that NORAD actually does.
Project Ploughshares, May 2003

 

30 mai 2003

Monsieur le Premier Ministre et Messieurs les Membres du Cabinet:

Permettez-moi d’exprimer mon inquiétude devant l’intention, exprimée par le gouvernement canadien, d’étudier la possibilité de collaborer au plan étatsunien de déploiement d’un bouclier antimissiles (BMD).

Les Églises canadiennes poursuivent depuis longtemps des échanges avec le gouvernement canadien au sujet des systèmes de déploiement d’armes dans l’espace, car il s’agit là de décisions d’ordre profondément moral traduisant nos valeurs à long terme. Voici donc les valeurs que nous vous demandons de prendre en compte dans vos prises de décision:

Prévention de la guerre et établissement de la paix – S’attacher à trouver des moyens de résoudre pacifiquement les conflits et poursuivre la promotion de la sécurité de tous les humains et du bienêtre de tous les peuples. Dieu nous a commandé de faire la paix et d’éviter la guerre.

Désarmement – Insister sur les limites strictes du recours à la force. Les armes nucléaires, nous le réitérons, sont une abomination et sont contraires à la volonté de Dieu.

Responsabilité de la gestion de la création – Reconnaître dans la création – y compris dans l’espace – une source abondante de vie et de richesses, ainsi que le patrimoine, exempt d’armes, de l’humanité entière.

Imputabilité des institutions publiques – Responsable de la protection de ces valeurs, le gouvernement canadien doit conserver sa capacité d’évaluer et de vérifier en toute indépendance toute menace perçue, ainsi que d’y réagir.

Nous vous demandons de nous assurer, à la lumière de ces valeurs, que le gouvernement du Canada établira les conditions et les exigences de sécurité qu’on doit respecter pour que le pays apporte un appui matériel ou politique au bouclier antimissiles. Nous apprécierions tout particulièrement une réponse aux questions suivantes:

  1. Le Canada va-t-il exiger que les États-Unis s’engagent sans réserves, d’une part, à ce que le bouclier antimissiles ne comporte pas d’installation ni d’essais d’armements dans l’espace et, d’autre part, à ce qu’il respecte la norme mondiale et ne viole pas la politique canadienne opposée, depuis longtemps, à la militarisation de l’espace?
  2. Le Canada sera-t-il prêt à inclure dans les discussions sur le bouclier antimissiles une demande explicite au gouvernement américain d’accepter de discuter à Genève, lors de la Conférence sur le désarmement, de l’interdiction des armes spatiales, avant d’aller plus avant dans le déploiement du bouclier antimissiles?
  3. Le Canada va-t-il profiter de ces discussions pour requérir la clarification et le désaveu des éléments de la stratégie de sécurité nationale et de la doctrine nucléaire des États-Unis qui affirment le droit de conserver l’option de recourir, ou de menacer de recourir, aux armes nucléaires contre des pays qui ne disposent pas de telles armes?
  4. Le Canada va-t-il demander aux États-Unis d’expliciter comment ils se proposent de travailler, avec la communauté internationale, à prévenir la prolifération des missiles balistiques?
  5. Enfin, le Canada sera-t-il prêt à discuter d’autres ententes de coopération en matière défense, où le NORAD assumerait à nouveau sa mission bilatérale originale, celle de la coopération à la défense aérienne et de sa coordination?

Le mémoire ci-joint de Project Ploughshares, une agence oecuménique du Conseil canadien des Églises spécialisée dans l’établissement de la paix et le désarmement, traite plus en détail du contexte de chacune de ces questions; nous apprécierions que vous teniez compte, dans votre réponse, des questions qu’on y soulève.

Nous savons bien que ce n’est pas dans une forteresse technologique qu’on saurait trouver la sécurité et le bien-être du peuple canadien, voire du monde entier. Le Conseil canadien des Églises croit, comme l’exprime d’ailleurs la politique du Canada, que la seule véritable protection contre les armes nucléaires réside dans leur abolition et leur prohibition permanente; nous craignons, comme beaucoup d’autres, que l’application du bouclier antimissiles ne sape – comme elle l’a déjà fait – les ententes existantes sur le
contrôle des armements et qu’elle ne fasse reculer considérablement les efforts de désarmement en incitant les autres pays à conserver ou à étendre leurs arsenaux pour contrer les avantages perçus du bouclier antimissiles.

Nous comptons poursuivre ce dialogue avec vous et attendons avec intérêt votre réponse.

Nos prières vous accompagnent en ces moments cruciaux; que la sagesse divine éclairer vos pas.

Prof. Richard Schneider, Président
Conseil canadien des Églises

Celui qui habite là où se cache le Très-Haut passe la nuit à l’ombre du Dieu souverain. Je dis du Seigneur « Il est mon refuge, ma forteresse, mon Dieu : sur lui je compte! » (Psaume 91.1-2)

«…martelant leurs épées, ils en feront des socs, de leurs lances ils feront des serpes. On ne brandira plus l’épée nation contre nation, on n’apprendra plus à se battre » (Ésaïe 2.4)

Déploiement d’un bouclier antimissiles par le Canada et les États-Unis: Questions à l’intention du Cabinet fédéral

28 mai 2003

Le ministre des Affaires étrangères, M. Bill Graham, déclarait récemment que « la meilleure façon de s’assurer que les intérêts du Canada soient bien servis consiste à maintenir le dialogue avec les États-Unis sur toutes les questions touchant notre commune sécurité continentale » (Chambre des Communes, 15 mai). La véritable valeur d’un tel dialogue s’évalue à la mesure dans laquelle nos partenaires écoutent et respectent nos préoccupations en matière de sécurité.

Le dialogue avec Washington devrait établir clairement les conditions et les exigences sécuritaires qu’il faudra respecter pour que le Canada apporte son appui matériel ou politique au projet de bouclier antimissiles. L’attrait de ce dernier est évident. Quel gouvernement responsable ne voudrait pas, en effet, protéger ses sujets contre l’attaque de missiles à ogives nucléaires, si une telle protection lui est offerte?

La responsabilité de protéger est une fonction primordiale du gouvernement, mais malheureusement, il ne s’ensuit pas que tout projet entrepris au nom de la protection amène la population à être et à se sentir plus en sécurité.

Les questions suivantes devraient donc se retrouver au coeur des discussions entre le Canada et les États-Unis.

1. Le Canada va-t-il exiger que les États-Unis s’engagent sans réserves, d’une part, à ce que le bouclier antimissiles ne comporte pas d’installation ni d’essais d’armements dans l’espace et, d’autre part, à ce qu’il respecte la norme mondiale et ne viole pas la politique canadienne opposée, depuis longtemps, à la militarisation de l’espace?

La militarisation de l’espace n’est pas une vague possibilité : il est de l’intention explicite et avouée des États-Unis d’installer des armements dans l’espace. En avril 2003, le Missile Defence Agency (MDA) déclarait que son initiative d’installation d’intercepteurs en phase de lancement se concentrerait d’abord sur des intercepteurs basés sur terre et en mer, mais qu’on en viendrait à en déployer des « satellites en orbite basse terrestre. » Le rapport poursuivait que la MDA entreprendrait la production d’un intercepteur à énergie cinétique à base spatiale dans l’exercice budgétaire 2004. En outre, le budget 2004-2005 prévoit le déploiement d’une base d’essais d’armements dans l’espace d’ici à 2008, ainsi que « des essais initiaux en orbite commençant par trois à cinq satellites » en 2008-2009.

2. Le Canada sera-t-il prêt à inclure dans les discussions sur le bouclier antimissiles une demande explicite au gouvernement américain d’accepter de discuter à Genève, lors de la Conférence sur le désarmement, de l’interdiction des armes spatiales, avant d’aller plus avant dans le déploiement du bouclier antimissiles?

La Conférence sur le désarmement (CD) est le principal organisme de négociation du désarmement, mais les pourparlers sur les armements spatiaux ont été retardés, ces dernières années, par suite d’une mésentente sur l’ordre du jour, à laquelle les États-Unis pourraient mettre fin en agréant simplement à des négociations de bonne foi sur « la prévention de la course aux armes dans l’espace. » La CD n’est ni la seule, ni la plus efficace des tribunes pour de telles négociations, mais tout consentement du Canada à appuyer le projet de bouclier antimissiles sans, en contrepartie, l’engagement des États-Unis à négocier l’interdiction des armements spatiaux, représenterait de la part du Canada l’abandon de son engagement historique à faire de l’espace une zone exempte d’armements.

3. Le Canada va-t-il profiter de ces discussions sur le bouclier antimissiles pour requérir la clarification et le désaveu des éléments de la stratégie de sécurité nationale et de la doctrine nucléaire des États-Unis qui affirment le droit de conserver l’option de recourir, ou de menacer de recourir, aux armes nucléaires contre des pays qui ne disposent pas de telles armes?

Les États-Unis continuent d’étudier de nouvelles générations d’armements nucléaires, notamment d’armes terrestres à faible portée destinées à être utilisées contre des cibles situées dans des États non nucléaires (telles que les armes dites « destructrices de bunkers »). Ces pays sont alors tentés d’acquérir leur propre force nucléaire de dissuasion en cas de conflit persistant avec les États-Unis. Le Canada pourrait rappeler à ces derniers qu’il leur suffirait, pour contrer la pression d’une telle prolifération, de désavouer la recherche de nouvelles armes en ratifiant le traité d’interdiction des essais et en réitérant clairement les « assurances de sécurité négative » requises par le Conseil de Sécurité en 1995, en vertu desquelles les pays disposant d’armements nucléaires déclarent qu’ils n’utiliseront pas et ne menaceront pas d’utiliser des armes nucléaires contre des pays qui n’en disposent pas.

4. Le Canada va-t-il demander aux États-Unis d’expliciter comment ils se proposent de travailler, avec la communauté internationale, à prévenir la prolifération des missiles balistiques, étant donné que le bouclier missile prévu par les États-Unis court la chance de réussir si la menace des missiles est réduite au minimum?

L’ironie, en matière de bouclier antimissiles, c’est qu’il n’a de chance d’être efficace que si la diplomatie du désarmement réduit la menace au minimum. Même les États-Unis reconnaissent que ce bouclier ne réussira à intercepter qu’un très petit nombre de missiles et que, même alors, aucun système ne peut garantir de succès total. Ce sont donc le contrôle des armes et le désarmement qui constituent la clé du contrôle de la menace des missiles nucléaires et, par voie conséquence, la clé du succès du projet de bouclier antimissiles. Si on ne limite pas strictement la menace de missiles balistiques, tout projet de bouclier antimissiles sera voué à l’échec.

Les États-Unis et le Canada ont donc tout intérêt à recourir à une diplomatie anti-prolifération efficace; si cette dernière réussit au point de rendre le projet de bouclier réalisable, le Canada pourrait faire entendre aux États-Unis que plutôt que de dépenser des centaines de
milliards pour parer à une menace minimale, ils feraient mieux d’affecter ces ressources à d’autres efforts de désarmement et de non-prolifération.

5. Enfin, le Canada sera-t-il prêt à discuter d’autres ententes de coopération en matière de défense où le NORAD assumerait à nouveau sa mission bilatérale originale, celle de la coopération à la défense aérienne et de sa coordination?

La principale activité de défense bilatérale coopérative que facilite la NORAD est la défense aérienne. Elle surveille également les lancements de missiles, mais cette tâche fait partie d’un rôle national des États-Unis rattaché à sa force nucléaire. La défense aérienne, cependant, est une opération bilatérale.

Dans la période post-guerre froide, cette opération coopérative n’a que très peu à faire avec les questions de défense territoriale traditionnelles – on se concentre plutôt sur des problèmes tels que l’interdiction de la drogue et l’importation illégale d’armes aux États-Unis, lesquels occupent une place bien plus importante dans les préoccupations sécuritaires et, par là même, dans le travail véritable de NORAD.

Project Ploughshares, mai 2003

Spread the Word