Nuclear Disarmament Imperatives after the NPT PrepCom

Tasneem Jamal

Author
Ernie Regher

Speaking Notes and presentation to The House of Commons Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development, given on May 31, 2007, on behalf of Project Ploughshares and Veterans Against Nuclear Arms.

Speaking Notes

Presentation

Présentation (Français)

 

Speaking Notes

I am pleased to speak on behalf of both Project Ploughshares and Veterans Against Nuclear Arms. We have produced a longer paper on a nuclear disarmament agenda for Canada and I will be pleased to make the paper available to all members of the Committee. I encourage you to review in particular the brief history of VANA—an extraordinary organization of veterans who understand the realities of war, who know that the virtually limitless destructive power of nuclear weapons is not a source of security, and who have channeled their particular experiences as veterans into a decades-long call to rid the world of this overarching danger.

This year’s Preparatory Committee for the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference has confirmed two central realities: First, if the ailing NPT is to fulfill its foundational role in advancing global security it must be solidly balanced on its three equal pillars: disarmament, nonproliferation, and peaceful uses. Second, the international community is now well beyond simply debating a range of disarmament and nonproliferation options; rather, it is looking for meaningful implementation of an already agreed agenda.

While all states are equally bound by all Articles of the Treaty, there are really four categories of states in the nonproliferation regime; and each category faces particular implementation roles and challenges.

The biggest category, of course, is non-nuclear weapon states, and in exchange for forgoing nuclear weapons, they have received the legally binding promise of disarmament by the nuclear weapon states, and they are to have access to nuclear technology for peaceful purposes. But that access requires that they continuously verify their non-weapons status through safeguards agreements with the IAEA. Many have yet to fulfill their obligations (and, of course, Iran and the DPRK [North Korea] are in much more serious violation of their safeguards and NPT obligations). Furthermore, about three dozen of these states are in possession of nuclear power technology and thus must sign and ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty before it can enter into force. (Of the NNWS on the Annex II list, Iran, Indonesia, Egypt, and Colombia have signed but not ratified the CTBT; the DPRK, which has withdrawn from the NPT but now is on track to return to it, has not yet signed the CTBT).

Nuclear weapon states, the second category, are under legal obligation to eliminate their nuclear arsenals. At the 2000 Review Conference they renewed their commitment to achieving that goal, although they are not bound by a specific deadline. In the meantime nuclear weapon states are obliged to fulfill specific commitments that they have themselves made. I won’t go through the list, but irreversible and verifiable cuts to arsenals are at the core. Failure to meet these obligations constitutes noncompliance just as certainly as do failures by non-nuclear weapon states to meet all their safeguard requirements.

In the third category are India, Israel, and Pakistan—de facto nuclear weapons states but not signatories to the NPT. That does not mean they escape all disarmament obligations. They are bound by the NPT norm of nuclear disarmament, and as members of the CD (Conference on Disarmament) they are obligated to pursue in good faith the agreed objectives of that body, including the prevention of an arms race in outer space, legally binding negative security assurances to non-nuclear weapon states, and a fissile materials cutoff treaty. The CD also negotiated the Test Ban Treaty and all three, as states with nuclear technology, must ratify the Treaty for it to enter into force (only Israel has signed the CTBT, and none of the three has ratified it). Both are also in direct violation of Security Council Resolution 1172, which unambiguously calls on them to end their nuclear weapons programs.

The fourth category is non-nuclear weapon states within NATO—a group that obviously includes Canada. They find themselves in a stark contradiction—affirming within NATO that nuclear forces are essential to alliance security, while at the same time affirming within the NPT that nuclear disarmament is essential to global security. It is a contradiction that must be resolved in favour of the latter commitment.

So, what priorities should Canada pursue within this broad and essentially agreed disarmament agenda?

To continue to set the right course, each new Canadian Government should, as a matter of course and at the highest level, reaffirm Canada’s fundamental commitment to the elimination of nuclear weapons. With that unwavering goal always at the core of its efforts, Canada should continue to actively promote the early implementation of the broad nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation agenda, referred to above and rooted in the NPT and its 1995 and 2000 Review Conferences, giving priority to particular issues that it is in a good position to influence. There will necessarily be some shifts in priorities according to changing circumstances, but currently at least four of the issues deserve the focused attention of Canada.

First among these is attention to the disarmament machinery. Nuclear disarmament depends first and foremost on the political will of states to simply do it, but the institutional mechanisms through which they pursue that fundamental and urgent agenda are critically important. The continuing dysfunction in the CD suggests it is once again time for Canada, along with like-minded states, to explore having the First Committee of the UN General Assembly form ad hoc committees to take up the fourfold agenda that lies dormant at the CD—that is, the non-weaponization of space, negative security assurances, the fissile materials cut-off treaty, and new approaches to nuclear disarmament broadly.

In the context of the NPT, Canada should continue to press for a more effective governance structure involving annual decision-making meetings, the ability to respond to particular crises (such as the declaration of a State party’s intent to withdraw), and a permanent bureau or secretariat for the Treaty. In that context, Canada has made, and should continue to make, a point of promoting transparency through regular reporting by states on their compliance efforts and fuller NGO participation in the Treaty review process.

Second, the conflict regarding Iran’s uranium enrichment program raises important issues about the spread of weapons-sensitive civilian technologies, to which all states in compliance with their nonproliferation obligations are now legally entitled. It is in the interests of nuclear disarmament that access to these technologies be severely restricted and placed under international control through nondiscriminatory multilateral fuel supply arrangements. Canada, as a state with high levels of competence in relevant technologies, should take an active role in investigating and promoting international fuel cycle control mechanisms.

Third, the US-India civilian nuclear cooperation deal has led to proposals to exempt India from key guidelines of the Nuclear Suppliers Group. Canadian technology and interests are directly engaged. Canada must be at the fore of international efforts to bring India, Israel, and Pakistan under the rules and discipline of the nuclear nonproliferation system. In particular, and at a minimum, Canada should insist that the Nuclear Suppliers Group require that India ratify the Test Ban Treaty and abide by a verifiable freeze on the production of fissile material for weapons purposes before any modification of civilian cooperation guidelines is considered.

Finally, Canada cannot avoid promoting within NATO a resolution of the NATO/NPT contradiction in favour of the NPT disarmament commitment.

 

Presentation: Nuclear Disarmament Imperatives After the NPT Prepcom

This year’s Preparatory Committee (PrepCom) for the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference reflected all the divisions and controversies that continue to dog the global nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation effort, but in the end it muddled through to a conclusion that broadly recognized two unassailable realities. First, if the Treaty is to fulfill its foundational role in advancing global security it must be solidly balanced on its three equal pillars: disarmament, nonproliferation, and peaceful uses. Second, the international community is now well beyond simply debating a range of disarmament and nonproliferation policies; rather, it is looking for meaningful implementation of the already agreed agenda.

At the start of the PrepCom the commitment to balance was directly challenged. Christopher A. Ford, the US Special Representative for Nuclear Nonproliferation argued that “both the plain meaning of the text of Article VI and its negotiating history thus make clear that the disarmament provisions of the NPT are not substantively equivalent to the Treaty’s nonproliferation obligations…. For better or worse, Article VI actually does not contain concrete disarmament requirements.”1 Canada’s Ambassador for Disarmament, Paul Meyer, put forward the counter and prevailing view, that “the norm against nuclear proliferation, the legal obligation to pursue good faith negotiations to nuclear disarmament, and the framework for cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy” are three parallel “core commitments” that are “equal, inseparable and mutually reinforcing.”2

The commitment to implementation was challenged by Iran on the grounds that a reference to implementation in the agenda would focus attention on its dispute with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Security Council while ignoring the failure of Nuclear Weapon States to comply with the disarmament obligations of Article VI of the NPT.

In the end, the Chair’s summary, not a consensus document approved by states but still a reflection of the majority views in the PrepCom, made it clear that States had “reaffirmed that the Treaty rests on three pillars, nuclear disarmament, nuclear non-proliferation, and peaceful uses of energy. The importance of balanced, full and non-selective application and implementation of the Treaty was stressed” (paragraph 2).3 The Chair’s summary then went on to elaborate the PrepCom’s comprehensive approach to the agreed action agenda that is to be implemented—not only the NPT itself, but also “the decisions and resolution of the 1995 Review and Extension Conference…and the Final Document of the 2000 Review Conference” (paragraph 3). The 2007 PrepCom will unfortunately not end the quarrelling over balance and implementation, but it is now the obligation of Canada, along with all states wanting to see real progress in nuclear disarmament, to vigorously promote the balanced implementation of the well established agenda. That agenda is reviewed in the Ploughshares/VANA working paper.4

There are really four categories of states in the nonproliferation regime; and each group of states faces particular implementation roles and challenges. The four groups are: Non-Nuclear Weapon States (NNWS)—the vast majority of states, the five States recognized as Nuclear Weapon States (NWS) by the NPT, three non-NPT states (each of which has nuclear weapons—India, Israel, and Pakistan), and NNWS that are members of a nuclear alliance (currently the 23 NNWS in NATO).

1. NNWS. In exchange for forgoing nuclear weapons, NNWS have access to nuclear technology for peaceful purposes. They must continuously verify their non-weapons status by entering into safeguards agreements with the IAEA. The vast majority of NNWS genuinely forgo nuclear weapons, but important implementation requirements remain incomplete. Some 31 NNWS still need to enter into the basic safeguards agreements with the IAEA that are required by the NPT. For the IAEA to be able to provide full assurance of nonproliferation compliance, States must also implement the Additional Protocol to comprehensive safeguard agreements, and only 78 states have completed that process.5 NNWS with nuclear power plants are among the 44 States listed in Annex II of Article XIV of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), all of which must ratify the CTBT before it can enter into force. (Of the NNWS on the Annex II list, Iran, Indonesia, Egypt, and Colombia have signed but not ratified the CTBT; the DPRK, which has withdrawn from the NPT but now is on track to return to it, has not yet signed the CTBT).6 Only two NNWS signatories to the NPT, Iran and DPRK,7 are currently under censure from the international community for specific violations of Treaty and Safeguards obligations.

2. NWS. NWS are under legal obligation to eliminate their nuclear arsenals. At the 2000 Review Conference they renewed their commitment to achieve that goal, although they are not bound by a specific deadline. In the meantime the NWS are obliged to fulfill specific commitments made:

  • de-alert their strategic arsenals,
  • reduce the role of nuclear weapons in their security arrangements,
  • make irreversible and verifiable cuts to their arsenals,
  • provide legally binding assurances that they will not use or threaten to use nuclear weapons against NNWS,
  • refuse to aid other states in acquiring nuclear weapons,
  • ratify the CTBT, and
  • negotiate an FMCT (a treaty to ban production on fissile material for weapons purposes).

Failure to meet these obligations constitutes noncompliance just as certainly as do NNWS failures to meet all safeguard requirements.

3. Non-NPT States. India, Israel, and Pakistan, while not signatories to the NPT, nevertheless have specific disarmament and nonproliferation obligations, by virtue of the NPT’s disarmament norm and the agenda pursued by the Conference on Disarmament (CD), of which all three are members. The CD negotiated the CTBT and all three of the non-NPT states are included in Annex II and thus are required to ratify the CTBT for it to enter into force (only Israel has signed the CTBT, and none of the three has ratified it). All three are also slated to participate in negotiating the FMCT once the CD gets serious about a program of work.

4. NNWS in NATO. NATO is the only military alliance with an overt nuclear weapons use doctrine—a doctrine that compromises the disarmament and nonproliferation commitments of the NNWS members of NATO, including Canada (see below). Some of the NNWS members of NATO host nuclear weapons on their territories, arguably a violation of Article II of the NPT.

Canadian Priorities

Each new Canadian Government should, as a matter of course and at the highest level, reaffirm Canada’s fundamental commitment to the elimination of nuclear weapons. With that unwavering goal always at the core of its efforts, Canada should continue to actively promote the early implementation of the broad nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation agenda described above, giving priority to particular issues that it is in a good position to influence. There will necessarily be some shifts in priorities according to changing circumstances, but currently at least four of the issues deserve the focused attention of Canada.

1. The disarmament machinery. Nuclear disarmament depends first and foremost on the political will of states to simply do it, but the institutional mechanisms through which they pursue that fundamental and urgent agenda are critically important. The mechanisms can themselves become obstacles to effective process, and it is clear that in the Geneva-based Conference on Disarmament and the NPT Review Process there are institutional arrangements and practices that serve to impede the disarmament progress. These impediments require urgent attention and Canada, having developed significant proposals to address the “institutional deficit” within the disarmament system, is well placed to work with likeminded states to press for constructive change.

In the context of the NPT, a more effective governance structure involving annual decision-making meetings, the ability to respond to a particular crisis (such as the declaration of a State party’s intent to withdraw), and a permanent bureau or secretariat are among proposals under consideration. Canada has made, and should continue to make, a point of promoting transparency through regular reporting by states on their compliance efforts and fuller NGO participation in the Treaty review process.

2. The internationalization of the nuclear fuel cycle. The conflict regarding Iran’s uranium enrichment program raises important issues about the spread of sensitive civilian technologies—to which all states in compliance with their nonproliferation obligations are legally entitled—that have immediate relevance for the pursuit of nuclear weapons. It is in the interests of nuclear disarmament that these technologies be severely restricted and placed under international control through nondiscriminatory multilateral arrangements. Canada, as a state with high levels of competence in relevant technologies, should take an active role in investigating and promoting international fuel cycle control mechanisms.

3. Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) guidelines for civilian nuclear cooperation with de facto nuclear weapon states. The US-India civilian nuclear cooperation deal has led to proposals to exempt India from key guidelines of the NSG, and Canadian technology and interests are directly engaged. Canada must be at the fore of international efforts to universalize the NPT and to bring India, Israel, and Pakistan under the rules and discipline of the nuclear nonproliferation system. It is especially important to ensure that nonproliferation objectives are not compromised, but actually strengthened, through any modification of NSG guidelines to facilitate civilian nuclear cooperation with India. In particular Canada should insist that the NSG require that India ratify the CTBT and abide by a verifiable freeze on the production of fissile material for weapons purposes before modification of civilian cooperation guidelines are considered.

4. Resolving the NATO/NPT contradiction. As a NATO country Canada is juggling two conflicting commitments. Through NATO Canada insists that nuclear weapons are essential to its security and are thus to be retained for the foreseeable future. Through the NPT and related disarmament forums Canada promotes the elimination of nuclear weapons at the earliest possible date. This conflict must be resolved in favour of the second commitment.

  1. Remarks by Dr. Christopher A. Ford, United States Special Representative for Nuclear Nonproliferation Conference on “Preparing for 2010: Getting the Process Right,” Annecy, France, 17 March 2007.
  2. Canada, Opening statement, 2007 NPT PrepCom, Vienna, 30 April, 2007.
  3. The Chair’s summary.
  4. Ernie Regehr, Nuclear Disarmament: An Action Agenda for Canada, Ploughshares Working Paper 07-1 (prepared in cooperation with Veterans Against Nuclear Arms).
  5. See the “Facts and Figures” section of the IAEA Web Site “News Centre.”
  6. The website of the preparatory commission of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty provides up-to-date information on the status of ratification.
  7. North Korea has withdrawn from the Treaty but is on track towards ending its nuclear program and rejoining the NPT.

 

Présentation (Français): Les impératifs du désarmement nucléaire après la première réunion du Comité préparatoire du TNP

Cette année, la réunion du Comité préparatoire de la Conférence d’examen du Traité de non-prolifération nucléaire (TNP) de 2010 a fait ressortir toutes les divergences et controverses que continuent de soulever les efforts mondiaux de désarmement et de non-prolifération nucléaires. Cependant, en bout en ligne, les participants se sont entendus tant bien que mal sur une conclusion qui reconnaît en gros deux réalités irréfutables. Premièrement, si le rôle fondamental du Traité est de faire avancer la sécurité mondiale, il doit alors reposer sur un équilibre solide entre trois piliers égaux : le désarmement, la non-prolifération et les utilisations pacifiques. Deuxièmement, la communauté internationale a maintenant dépassé depuis longtemps le simple débat sur l’éventail des politiques de désarmement et de non-prolifération; elle cherche plutôt des moyens d’appliquer de façon concrète le programme déjà adopté.

Dès le début de la réunion du Comité préparatoire, cette recherche d’un équilibre a été directement contestée. Christopher A. Ford, le représentant spécial des États-Unis pour la non-prolifération nucléaire, a soutenu que « le sens manifeste de l’article VI de même que l’historique de sa négociation indiquent clairement que les dispositions du TNP relatives au désarmement ne sont pas essentiellement équivalentes à ses obligations […] Pour le meilleur ou pour le pire, l’article VI ne contient en fait aucune obligation concrète de désarmement »1. L’ambassadeur du Canada au désarmement, Paul Meyer, a avancé l’opinion contraire, mais prédominante que « la norme contre la prolifération nucléaire, l’obligation juridique de mener de bonne foi des négociations sur le désarmement nucléaire, ainsi que le cadre de coopération pour les utilisations pacifiques de l’énergie nucléaire » constituent trois « engagements fondamentaux » qui sont « égaux, inséparables et mutuellement complémentaires »2.

L’Iran a remis en question la volonté réelle d’appliquer le Traité aux motifs qu’une référence à une telle application dans le programme attirerait l’attention sur son différend avec l’Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique (AIEA) et le Conseil de sécurité, tout en passant sous silence l’incapacité des États dotés d’armes nucléaires (EDAN) de respecter leurs obligations en matière de désarmement découlant de l’article VI du TNP.

Finalement, le résumé du président, qui n’a pas obtenu l’approbation unanime des États, mais qui exprime quand même l’opinion majoritaire du Comité exploratoire, indique clairement que les États parties ont « réaffirmé que le Traité reposait sur trois piliers : le désarmement nucléaire, la non-prolifération et les utilisations pacifiques de l’énergie nucléaire. On a souligné l’importance de mettre en oeuvre et d’appliquer le Traité de manière équilibrée, complète et non sélective » (paragraphe 2)3. Le président a poursuivi en précisant l’approche englobante du Comité préparatoire vis-à-vis du programme d’action qui a été adopté et qui sera mis en oeuvre – il visera non seulement le TNP même, mais aussi « les décisions et les résolutions de la Conférence d’examen et de prorogation de 1995 […] et le document final de la Conférence d’examen de 2000 » (paragraphe 3). Malheureusement, cette réunion du Comité préparatoire de 2007 ne mettra pas un terme à la querelle entourant l’équilibre à maintenir et l’application du Traité, mais c’est maintenant l’obligation du Canada, ainsi que de tous les États qui veulent voir des progrès réels dans le désarmement nucléaire, de promouvoir avec énergie une application équilibrée du programme bien établi. Ce programme est passé en revue dans le document de travail de Project Ploughshares et des Vétérans contre les armes nucléaires4.

En fait, quatre catégories d’États adhèrent au régime de non-prolifération, et chaque groupe doit assumer des rôles et des défis particuliers en matière de mise en application. Ces quatre groupes sont : les États non dotés d’armes nucléaires (ENDAN), soit la vaste majorité; les cinq États reconnus comme États dotés d’armes nucléaires (EDAN) par le TNP; les trois États non-parties au TNP (mais possédant des armes nucléaires – l’Inde, Israël et le Pakistan); et les États non dotés d’armes nucléaires et membres d’une alliance nucléaire (en ce moment, les 23 ENDAN au sein de l’OTAN).

1. Les États non dotés d’armes nucléaires (ENDAN) : En renonçant aux armes nucléaires, les ENDAN ont en échange accès à la technologie nucléaire à des fins pacifiques. Ils sont tenus de vérifier continuellement leur statut d’ENDAN en signant un accord de garanties avec l’AIEA. La grande majorité des ENDAN renoncent vraiment aux armes nucléaires, mais des exigences importantes de mise en application ne sont toujours pas remplies. Pour environ 31 ENDAN, il reste encore à conclure des accords de garanties de base avec l’AIEA, qui sont requis par le TNP. Afin que l’AIEA soit en mesure de fournir une garantie complète du respect de la non-prolifération, les États doivent également appliquer le Protocole additionnel aux accords de garanties étendues, ce que seulement 78 États ont fait5. Les ENDAN qui disposent de centrales nucléaires comptent parmi les 44 États énumérés à l’annexe II de l’article XIV du Traité d’interdiction complète des essais nucléaires (TICEN) qui doivent tous le ratifier avant qu’il puisse entrer en vigueur. (Parmi les États figurant sur la liste de l’annexe II, l’Iran, l’Indonésie, l’Égypte et la Colombie ont signé le TICEN, mais ne l’ont pas ratifié; la République populaire démocratique de Corée (Corée du Nord), qui s’est retirée du TNP, mais qui s’apprête à y revenir, ne l’a pas encore signé)6. Seulement deux ENDAN signataires du TNP, l’Iran et la Corée du Nord7, sont actuellement blâmés par la communauté internationale pour avoir violé des obligations particulières du Traité et de l’accord de garanties.

2. Les États dotés d’armes nucléaires (EDAN) : Les EDAN ont l’obligation juridique de détruire leur arsenal nucléaire. À la Conférence d’examen de 2000, ils ont renouvelé leur engagement à atteindre cet objectif, bien qu’ils ne soient pas obligés de respecter une échéance précise. Entre-temps, les EDAN sont tenus de remplir les engagements qu’ils ont pris:

  • diminuer le niveau d’alerte de leur arsenal stratégique
  • réduire le rôle des armes nucléaires dans leurs mesures de sécurité
  • procéder à des réductions irréversibles et vérifiables de leur arsenal
  • fournir des garanties légalement valables qu’ils n’utiliseront pas ou ne menaceront pas d’utiliser des armes contre des États qui n’en disposent pas
  • refuser d’aider d’autres États à acquérir des armes nucléaires
  • ratifier le TICEN;
  • négocier un traité sur l’interdiction de la production de matière fissile à des fins d’armement.

Le non-respect de ces obligations équivaut totalement au non-respect de toutes les exigences en matière de garanties par les ENDAN.

3. Les États non-parties au TNP : Bien qu’ils ne soient pas signataires du TNP, l’Inde, Israël et le Pakistan assument néanmoins des obligations précises en matière de désarmement et de non-prolifération, conformément à la norme de désarmement du TNP et au programme de la Conférence sur le désarmement (CD), dont ces trois pays sont membres. La CD a négocié le TICEN, et tous les États non-parties au TNP figurent dans l’annexe II; ils sont tenus par conséquent de le ratifier pour qu’il puisse entrer en vigueur (seul Israël a signé le TICEN; aucun ne l’a ratifié). En outre, les trois pays ont été désignés pour participer à la négociation du traité sur l’interdiction de la production de matière fissile, dès que la CD aura envisagé sérieusement un programme de travail.

4. Les États non dotés d’armes nucléaires membres de l’OTAN : L’OTAN est la seule alliance militaire qui embrasse une doctrine prévoyant ouvertement l’utilisation des armes nucléaires, doctrine qui met en péril les engagements en matière de désarmement et de non-prolifération pris par les ENDAN membres de l’OTAN, y compris le Canada (voir plus loin). Certains d’entre eux hébergent des armes nucléaires sur leur territoire, ce qui constitue sans nul doute une violation de l’article II du TNP.

Les priorités du Canada

Chaque nouveau gouvernement canadien devrait tout naturellement réaffirmer l’engagement fondamental pris par le pays d’éliminer les armes nucléaires, et ce, au plus haut niveau. En gardant cet objectif inébranlable au coeur de ses efforts, le Canada doit continuer à promouvoir activement l’application précoce du vaste programme de désarmement et de non-prolifération nucléaires déjà décrit, en accordant la priorité aux questions particulières sur lesquelles il peut user de son influence. Il y aura nécessairement quelques changements de priorité au gré des circonstances, mais actuellement, au moins quatre points méritent que le Canada s’y attarde.

1. Le mécanisme de désarmement : Le désarmement nucléaire dépend d’abord et avant tout de la volonté des États d’y prendre simplement part, mais les mécanismes institutionnels par lesquels ils réalisent ce programme fondamental et urgent sont d’une importance cruciale. Ces mécanismes peuvent eux-mêmes finir par entraver un processus efficace, et il est clair que la Conférence de Genève sur le désarmement et le processus d’examen du TNP prévoient des pratiques et des arrangements institutionnels qui freinent le désarmement. Ces obstacles requièrent une attention immédiate; le Canada, qui a formulé des propositions importantes pour combler le « déficit institutionnel » dans le régime de désarmement, est bien placé pour travailler avec des États aux vues similaires afin d’exiger des changements constructifs.

Dans le contexte du TNP, une structure de gouvernance plus efficace donnant lieu à des réunions annuelles de prise de décision, la capacité de réagir à une crise (comme la déclaration de l’intention d’un État partie de se retirer du Traité) et la création d’un bureau ou d’un secrétariat permanent font partie des propositions envisagées. Le Canada s’est fait et devrait continuer à se faire un point d’honneur de promouvoir la transparence (grâce à des rapports périodiques sur les efforts de conformité des divers États) et la pleine participation des ONG au processus d’examen du Traité.

2. L’internationalisation du cycle du combustible nucléaire : Le conflit concernant le programme d’enrichissement de l’uranium de l’Iran soulève des questions importantes sur la diffusion des technologies civiles de nature délicate – auxquelles peuvent avoir légalement accès tous les États respectant leurs obligations de non-prolifération – qui présentent un intérêt immédiat pour la poursuite des armes nucléaires. Le désarmement nucléaire exige que ces technologies soient sérieusement limitées et placées sous contrôle international par l’intermédiaire d’arrangements multilatéraux non discriminatoires. Le Canada, qui est un pays doté de grandes compétences dans ces technologies, devrait jouer un rôle actif dans l’étude et la promotion des mécanismes internationaux de contrôle du cycle du combustible nucléaire.

3. Directives du Groupe des fournisseurs nucléaires (NSG) pour favoriser la coopération nucléaire civile avec les États officiellement dotés d’armes nucléaires : L’accord de coopération nucléaire civile entre les États-Unis et l’Inde a abouti à des propositions visant à exonérer l’Inde des principales directives du NSG, et la technologie et les intérêts canadiens sont directement concernés. Le Canada doit être une figure de proue dans les efforts internationaux déployés pour rendre le TNP universel et amener l’Inde, Israël et le Pakistan à respecter les règles et la discipline du régime de non-prolifération nucléaire. Il importe surtout de veiller à ne pas compromettre les objectifs de non-prolifération, mais plutôt à les renforcer, par des modifications apportées aux directives du NSG pour faciliter la coopération nucléaire civile avec l’Inde. Tout particulièrement, le Canada devrait insister pour que le NSG oblige l’Inde à ratifier le TICEN et à se soumettre à un gel vérifiable de la production de matière fissile à des fins d’armement avant qu’on envisage d’apporter des modifications aux directives relatives à la coopération civile.

4. Éliminer la contradiction entre l’OTAN et le TNP : En tant que pays membre de l’OTAN, le Canada essaie de concilier deux engagements contradictoires. Au sein de l’OTAN, il insiste pour dire que les armes nucléaires sont essentielles pour sa sécurité et qu’il faut donc les conserver dans un avenir prévisible. En revanche, par l’entremise du TNP et des forums connexes sur le désarmement, le Canada milite pour l’élimination des armes nucléaires le plus tôt possible. Pour mettre un terme à cette contradiction, il faut appuyer le second engagement.

  1. A Work Plan for the 2010 Review Cycle: Coping with Challenges Facing the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, par Christopher A. Ford, représentant spécial des États-Unis pour la non-prolifération nucléaire (déclaration d’ouverture à la réunion du Comité préparatoire du Traité de non-prolifération des armes nucléaire, le 30 avril 2007, à Vienne, en Autriche). [traduction]
  2. Canada, Déclaration d’ouverture, Comité préparatoire de la Conférence d’examen des Parties au TNP, Vienne, le 30 avril 2007.
  3. Le résumé du président et les autres documents sur le Comité préparatoire
  4. 4 Ernie Regehr, Nuclear Disarmament: An Action Agenda for Canada, document de travail 07-2 de Ploughshares (préparé en coopération avec les Vétérans contre les armes nucléaires).
  5. Voir la section « Facts and Figures » du site Web de l’AIEA (News Centre) (en anglais).
  6. Le site Web de la Commission préparatoire du Traité d’interdiction complète des essais nucléaires présente des renseignements à jour sur le statut de ratification, (en anglais).
  7. La Corée du Nord s’est retirée du TNP, mais elle s’apprête à mettre fin à son programme nucléaire et à revenir au TNP.
Spread the Word