Security Sector Reform and the Demand for Small Arms and Light Weapons

Tasneem Jamal

Briefing 01-7 Authors Dominick Donald and ’Funmi Olonisakin Dominick Donald and ’Funmi Olonisakin are Programme Officers in the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, at the United Nations. The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations. This briefing is based on …

Addressing the Demand Dimensions of Small Arms Abuse: Problems and opportunities

Tasneem Jamal

Briefing 01-6 Author Alejandro Bendaña Alejandro Bendaña is the Director, Centro de Estudios Internacionales (CEI), Managua, Nicaragua. International humanitarian attention has underscored the importance of confronting the proliferation, accumulation, and misuse of small arms. The humanitarian imperative, however, often tends to sideline, purposefully or not, the more contentious political issues. Three questions have to be placed squarely on the table …

Small Arms Demand Reduction and Human Security: Towards a people-centred approach to small arms

Tasneem Jamal

Briefing 01-5 Author Don Hubert Don Hubert is a Human Security Consultant on leave from the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade. The views presented are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of DFAIT. This briefing is based on a paper presented by the author to the International Workshop on Small Arms Demand Reduction, Toronto, …

Missile Proliferation, Globalized Insecurity and Demand-Side Strategies

Tasneem Jamal

Briefing 01-4  Author Ernie Regehr For the moment, demand for weapons of mass destruction remains significant, though not overwhelming. There are at least four prominent elements to reducing demand for weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and long-range ballistic missiles: promoting accountable governance, ameliorating regional insecurities, blocking ballistic missile defence, and challenging the double standard of non-proliferation. Recent comments out of …

Transfer of Military Equipment to Colombia Exposes Loopholes in Export Controls

Tasneem Jamal

Briefing 01-3 This briefing was released as a background document at a press conference held jointly with Amnesty International Canada and The Inter-Church Committee on Human Rights in Latin America (ICCHRLA) on March 20, 2001 in Ottawa. The transfer of surplus Canadian military helicopters to Colombia via the United States exposes a significant loophole in the Canadian export control system. A separate …

NATO and Nuclear Weapons: “Paragraph 32” endorses status quo

Tasneem Jamal

Briefing 01-2  NATO Foreign Ministers met in Brussels in December 2000 and approved the final report of the Alliance’s “Paragraph 32” nuclear policy review. The outcome of this review reinforced the case for continued public attention to NATO nuclear policy. The member states of NATO agreed at their April 1999 Washington Summit to conduct an internal review of NATO’s nuclear …

Missile Defence: Deployment is not inevitable

Tasneem Jamal

Briefing 01-1 The new administration of US President George W. Bush is coming into office with a strong commitment to deploying a “robust” National Missile Defense (NMD) system. Such a system would have major, potentially very damaging, implications for global security, provoking dangerous reactions in Russia and China, undermining or destroying important arms control agreements, blocking vital safety initiatives such …

Canada and Nuclear Weapons: Where do we stand at the beginning of 2000?

Tasneem Jamal

Briefing 00-1 Canada and the Nuclear Challenge Ploughshares Briefing 99/2 reported on the release in December 1998 of the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Trade’s report Canada and the Nuclear Challenge, which recommended a number of significant, positive changes in Canada’s nuclear-weapons-related policies, including greater effort to ensure that the goal of nuclear abolition is taken seriously, support …

Canada and the Crisis in Yugoslavia

Tasneem Jamal

Briefing 99-3 NATO bombing The NATO bombing must be stopped. Not because it lacks Security Council approval. Not because that would end the killing and ethnic cleansing. Not because NATO’s assault could not eventually crush the regime the Yugoslav regime of President Slobodan Milosevic. And certainly not because Canada and the rest of the world should not get involved in …