We Call for Peace: Statements on Peace by Canadian Churches and Religious Organizations

Tasneem Jamal

by the Canadian Council of Churches and supported by the major Canadian churches, Project Ploughshares presents this collection of Canadian church statements on peace and disarmament. They make a major contribution to a constructive and collective Canadian response to the crisis of the scores of armed conflicts which devastate the life of our world and to the crisis of escalating militarization. The statements raise acute questions of faith and security; if they offer no final or satisfactory answers, they surely call for critical participation in the search for peace. The Canadian Council of Churches

Letter to Prime Minister Brian Mulroney November 28, 1990

The invasion of Kuwait by Iraq, the ensuing military buildup, and the threat of armed intervention by…

Humanitarian Intervention: A Review of Literature

Tasneem Jamal 0 Comments

…that harm the very people they seek to protect with little effect in inducing the local authorities and factions to curtail human rights abuses.”

Recourse to the United Nations

As stated above, states are obliged under international law to resolve their disputes by peaceful means (UN Charter, Article 2[3]). Article 37 of the Charter requires states, once they have exhausted the peaceful avenues to settle a dispute, to refer the dispute to the Security Council. Security Council

The issue, therefore, must be formally brought before the Security Council. Cassese (1999, p. 27) specifies that failure to act by the Security Council includes the Council’s confining “itself to deploring or condemning the massacres, plus possibly terming the situation a threat…

Humanitarian Intervention: A Review of Literature

Tasneem Jamal

…that harm the very people they seek to protect with little effect in inducing the local authorities and factions to curtail human rights abuses.”

Recourse to the United Nations

As stated above, states are obliged under international law to resolve their disputes by peaceful means (UN Charter, Article 2[3]). Article 37 of the Charter requires states, once they have exhausted the peaceful avenues to settle a dispute, to refer the dispute to the Security Council. Security Council

The issue, therefore, must be formally brought before the Security Council. Cassese (1999, p. 27) specifies that failure to act by the Security Council includes the Council’s confining “itself to deploring or condemning the massacres, plus possibly terming the situation a threat…

Human Security and Canadian Defence Policy

Tasneem Jamal

division within Canada.

Mr. Richardson said that my comments don’t reflect the Canadian mainstream. The Canadian mainstream is divided on this very question. The Canada 21 group of prominent Canadians came up with a very different vision for Canadian defence policy than is reflected in the current defence white paper. It’s not that the white paper represents the mainstream and all others are marginal; there’s a lack of consensus in Canada. Canada will never find the political will and political support for major military procurement as long as there is that lack of consensus and a feeling that the Canadian defence policy doesn’t reflect Canadian consensus.

So I think there is an urgent requirement, and what I’m putting before the…

US Imposes Improvements to Canadian Export Controls

Kenneth Epps

accept sole Canadian control in these cases, and Canadian companies must apply to both the US and Canadian governments for authorization to export. In contrast, the Canadian government makes no equivalent demands on US companies intending to re-export controlled goods of Canadian origin. Yet, the entrenchment of the US requirement in Canadian law suggests Canada should put in place the same standards for Canadian military transfers to the US. Canadian control of US company export of military goods of Canadian origin should not be viewed to be “extraterritorial,” as the Canadian government has argued, but as a legitimate requirement of controlling the final end-use of military products. By extending such controls, Canada would contribute to improved export controls on both…

Prepare for Peace in Iraq

Tasneem Jamal

A public statement issued by the Justice and Peace Commission of The Canadian Council of Churches, KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives and Project Ploughshares.

On January 17, 2003 the Justice and Peace Commission of the Canadian Council of Churches, KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives, and Project Ploughshares issued a public statement, Prepare for Peace in Iraq, along with a background document. All Canadians were invited to endorse the statement’s message for a peaceful and enduring resolution of the Iraq crisis. National church leaders commended the statement to congregations and parishes across Canada and Project Ploughshares was asked by the statement sponsors to collect the responses and to forward them to the Prime Minister at regular intervals. Listed below are the

Canadian Arms Sales to the Third World: A Record Year for Team Canada

Kenneth Epps

arms deliveries for all major suppliers except France between 1993 and 1994.

Figure 1 (Global Arms Sales to Third World) and Figure 2 (Canadian Arms Sales to Third World) illustrate the extent to which recent Canadian military exports to the Third World are out of step with the global trend. While worldwide arms transfers to developing nations dropped steadily from a peak in 1987, the volume of Canadian military exports, after an initial decline during the period, rose dramatically in 1992 and again in 1994. Put another way, during the same eight year period that global arms deliveries to Third World nations shrunk to one-quarter of their 1987 volume the equivalent Canadian exports almost tripled.

The larger…

Swords into Ploughshares: Agenda for the Next Parliament

Tasneem Jamal

in the recent UN Register of Conventional Arms) by providing more detail on Canadian military exports. Second, the Canadian government should prohibit all military transfers to countries involved in conflict, including pervasive internal conflict. Third, no Canadian military exports should be made to countries that grossly and systematically violate the rights of their citizens.

Improve export transparency

Government disclosure is an essential part of the democratization of Canadian policy formulation: it provides the public with the necessary information to scrutinize and debate national policies and practices. In the case of military exports, full disclosure also improves government accountability to Parliament and brings the wider public attention to military exports that is the basis for restraint.

Ottawa can make Canadian military…

Nuclear Weapons: the Problem, the Solution, Canada’s Role

Tasneem Jamal

call to immediately begin negotiations on a Nuclear Weapons Convention.”

8. Canadian Public Opinion. Reference was made to the 1998 survey of Canadian public opinion by the Angus Reid Group Inc., which showed that 75 percent of Canadians believe that nuclear weapons pose a threat to world security rather than enhancing world security. On the heels of Canada’s leadership in the movement to abolish anti-personnel landmines world wide, Canadians are almost unanimous in supporting Canadian involvement in global negotiations to abolish nuclear weapons; 92 percent of Canadians say they support a leadership role for Canada in global negotiations leading to the elimination of nuclear weapons.

9. Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (CNANW). In 1996, CNANW was established as a…

Transfer of Military Equipment to Colombia Exposes Loopholes in Export Controls

Tasneem Jamal

“loopholes” described below, however, make it possible for Canadian exporters to avoid that requirement in certain circumstances.

Loophole #1

Canadian military goods that are refurbished or used in manufacturing in another country do not require a Canadian permit for transfer to their final destination.

The intent of the Canadian military export control system is to control the transfer of Canadian military goods to their final destination, the point at which they enter into military use. If the CH-135 helicopters sold to the US had been immediately transhipped to Colombia, a Canadian export permit identifying Colombia as the final destination would have been required. Under such circumstances, the US would have been regarded only as a trans-shipment point and Colombia would…