We Call for Peace: Statements on Peace by Canadian Churches and Religious Organizations

Tasneem Jamal

Working Paper 94-3

Table of Contents

Introduction The Canadian Council of Churches The Anglican Church of Canada The Catholic Church and organizations The Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada Mennonite conferences and organizations The Presbyterian Church in Canada The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) The United Church of Canada

Introduction

By Martin Rumscheidt, Project Ploughshares National Board member

There is no peace to keep,” said the blue-helmeted soldier. Such has been the experience of the United Nations in its nearly 40-year-long effort to find the way to peace. Was Mahatma Gandhi right when he declared that there is no way to peace but that peace is the way?

Churches throughout the world have

Humanitarian Intervention: A Review of Literature

Tasneem Jamal 0 Comments

…particular on NATO’s intervention in Kosovo. It is not intended to be an exhaustive analysis. Rather, its purpose is to provide an overview of some of the important issues surrounding unauthorised humanitarian intervention with a view to facilitating a discussion of policy options for the Canadian government. It addresses the following questions: Is there a legal or moral right or obligation on the part of states to respond to situations of gross violations of human rights? Is there an emerging legal right or norm that allows humanitarian enforcement action outside of the Charter regime? What are the possible criteria for humanitarian intervention which could inform governmental decision-making in a situation where the Security Council is unable to take action?

Definition…

Humanitarian Intervention: A Review of Literature

Tasneem Jamal

…particular on NATO’s intervention in Kosovo. It is not intended to be an exhaustive analysis. Rather, its purpose is to provide an overview of some of the important issues surrounding unauthorised humanitarian intervention with a view to facilitating a discussion of policy options for the Canadian government. It addresses the following questions: Is there a legal or moral right or obligation on the part of states to respond to situations of gross violations of human rights? Is there an emerging legal right or norm that allows humanitarian enforcement action outside of the Charter regime? What are the possible criteria for humanitarian intervention which could inform governmental decision-making in a situation where the Security Council is unable to take action?

Definition…

Human Security and Canadian Defence Policy

Tasneem Jamal

…for (most) military goods transferred to the US, there is no adequate reporting system. As a result, Canada’s annual military export report currently includes no information on sales to the US.

References

Ball, Nicole 1992, Pressing for Peace: Can Aid Induce Reform? Overseas Development Council, Washington.

Canadian Defence Industries Association 1998, “A Canadian Industry Perspective on Canada/United States Defense Trade: Policies and Issues,” October.

OECD 1998, Military Expenditures in Developing Countries: Security and Development.

Figures

 

 

Excerpt from Standing Committee on National Defence and Veterans Affairs – Evidence, May 27, 1999

The Chairman (Mr. Pat O’Brien [London-Fanshawe, Lib]): Thank you, Mr. Regehr, very much for…

US Imposes Improvements to Canadian Export Controls

Kenneth Epps

Author Kenneth Epps

The Ploughshares Monitor Spring 2002 Volume 23 Issue 1

In April 2001 the federal government quietly put in place regulations which raised the standard of controls on Canadian arms production and export. The motivation was to retain the United States as Canada’s largest military export customer.

When Bill S-25, “an Act to amend the Defence Production Act,” received royal assent in October 2000, the government introduced – with little fanfare – important changes to the manner in which Canadian military contractors do business. In an effort to win back unique military trade arrangements with the US, unilaterally dropped by the Clinton administration the previous year, the Bill established improved regulations for access to and export of

Prepare for Peace in Iraq

Tasneem Jamal

A public statement issued by the Justice and Peace Commission of The Canadian Council of Churches, KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives and Project Ploughshares.

On January 17, 2003 the Justice and Peace Commission of the Canadian Council of Churches, KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives, and Project Ploughshares issued a public statement, Prepare for Peace in Iraq, along with a background document. All Canadians were invited to endorse the statement’s message for a peaceful and enduring resolution of the Iraq crisis. National church leaders commended the statement to congregations and parishes across Canada and Project Ploughshares was asked by the statement sponsors to collect the responses and to forward them to the Prime Minister at regular intervals. Listed below are

Canadian Arms Sales to the Third World: A Record Year for Team Canada

Kenneth Epps

Author Kenneth Epps

The Ploughshares Monitor September 1995 Volume 16 Issue 3

The good news is that global arms exports to the Third World were down in 1994. The other news is that Canada is swimming against the tide. Ploughshares researcher Ken Epps reports on the latest Canadian arms trade figures.

Bucking a global downward trend, Canadian arms sales to the Third World jumped more than 40 per cent in 1994 to reach an all-time high the latest government records show. While other weapons suppliers experienced a drop in Third World shipments, during 1994 Canada was able to boost military sales to its largest Third World buyer, significantly increase sales to several Pacific Rim countries, and improve on 1993

Swords into Ploughshares: Agenda for the Next Parliament

Tasneem Jamal

…billion per year roughly $2.5 billion less than currently spent.

Instead of taking advantage of this opportunity, further reducing military spending, and using the savings to maintain or even increase ODA and other non-military security spending, recent governments have cut ODA by an even greater percentage than they have cut military spending. According to the Canadian Council for International Co-operation, the ODA budget will be cut by more than 40 per cent between 1991-92 and 1999-00. The DND budget will be cut by only 25 per cent over the same period. In short, while both budgets have declined in absolute dollars, in relative terms Canadian governments have spent the post-Cold War period beating ploughshares into swords, rather than swords into…

Nuclear Weapons: the Problem, the Solution, Canada’s Role

Tasneem Jamal

…the University of Alberta, which awarded him an Honourary Doctor of Laws in 1986. He was appointed to the Senate in September, 1998. Senator Roche was elected Chairman of the United Nations Disarmament Committee at the 43rd General Assembly in 1988. An Officer of the Order of Canada, he was Chairman of the Canadian Committee for the Fiftieth Anniversary of the United Nations. He is currently Chairman of Canadian Pugwash and the Canadian Network to Abolish Nuclear Weapons. Senator Roche’s most recent book is The Ultimate Evil: The Fight to Ban Nuclear Weapons.

Project Ploughshares

Project Ploughshares is a Canadian peace and disarmament organization sponsored by the Canadian Council of Churches and supported by Canadian religious and civic organizations…

Transfer of Military Equipment to Colombia Exposes Loopholes in Export Controls

Tasneem Jamal

Briefing 01-3

This briefing was released as a background document at a press conference held jointly with Amnesty International Canada and The Inter-Church Committee on Human Rights in Latin America (ICCHRLA) on March 20, 2001 in Ottawa.

The transfer of surplus Canadian military helicopters to Colombia via the United States exposes a significant loophole in the Canadian export control system. A separate deal through which a Canadian company has contracted to repair and overhaul Colombian military aerospace equipment exposes a second loophole.

Canadian law, through the Export Import Permits Act, requires that the Minister of Foreign Affairs issue a permit for the transfer of any military equipment from Canada to any foreign destination other than the United States. The