It’s time for Canada to signal a shift in its nuclear disarmament policy

Cesar Jaramillo Featured, News, Nuclear Weapons

January 22nd marked a historic milestone for nuclear disarmament as the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) came into force, officially becoming part of international law. Adopted by 122 states in 2017, the TPNW began a 90-day countdown to entry into force last October, when Honduras became the 50th state to ratify it. While many Canadians are celebrating, …

Five things to know about the nuclear ban treaty

Cesar Jaramillo Featured, Nuclear Weapons

Formally known as the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW), the nuclear ban treaty is a legally binding multilateral instrument that establishes an explicit prohibition of nuclear weapons, as a step to achieving their complete elimination. It was adopted by 122 states on July 7, 2017, at United Nations headquarters in New York.

Hope by treaty

Cesar Jaramillo Featured, Nuclear Weapons

On October 24, Honduras became the 50th state party to join the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW), triggering the 90-day process that will culminate in the Treaty’s entry into force. On January 22, 2021, the TPNW will officially become international law.

A challenging nuclear disarmament landscape for 2020

Cesar Jaramillo Current Publication, Featured, Nuclear Weapons, Ploughshares Monitor

The next year will be critical in the attempt to achieve a world free of nuclear weapons—and the outlook is hardly promising. The global nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation regime, already at the breaking point, will certainly face various overlapping challenges.
Here are some focal points that Project Ploughshares will be following closely:

The state of the nuclear disarmament/abolition regime

Cesar Jaramillo Current Publication, Featured, Nuclear Weapons

The last of three meetings in preparation for the 2020 Review Conference of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), was held April 29-May 10 in New York. The fault lines in the architecture of the whole nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation regime seem to be growing deeper, more profound.